MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

Links You’ll Love

How BIG is Google? Check out this great documentary:

Shake Up Learning is a website that features tips and techniques for educational technology, including Google, mobile learning and social media.

Well, now, this is interesting…here’s a nicely crafted revision of the traditional rubric. Instead of working on all those columns and rows, why not try the single-point rubric? Very cool! Read more here (and I love the name of the website, too!).

Google tip: If you’ve been using Google Classroom, be sure to check out this blog post to get an idea of some of the new features that were introduced this week.

October 15, 2014 Posted by | Education, GAFE, Google, Links You'll Love | , , , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

If you use Animoto, you’ll want to apply for a free Animoto Plus account. That allows you to choose from 57 styles to create 10-minute long videos. Plus accounts normally cost $5 per month but this is free for educators if you apply here.

Teaching with Google strategy: Here’s a useful strategy for using Google’s comments feature with students to help make their thinking visible. Nice!

Google tip: Need an online timer for a classroom activity? Just type timer into a Google search box. Simple and elegant. You can click on the brackets icon to have the timer go full screen, too!

If you want a quick collaborative space, check out Awwapp. It’s simple to create a whiteboard and invite by URL. You can post completed whiteboards or save them as .png images.

October 8, 2014 Posted by | Links You'll Love | , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

EduCanon is a website that enables you to take a video and assign questions for your students to answer at pre-determined spots. Check out my sample video here. This is great for flipped classes.

Still haven’t signed up for JEDcamp Midwest? What’s holding you back? Here are 10 reasons to sign up TODAY.

Google Tip #1: If you love Google forms (you know I do!), check out this blog post about recent improvements. For instance, you can now shuffle questions (which is great if you want to use a form for an assessment), and limit people to only submitting one response per form. You can also insert a video into a form, which lends itself to using Google Form as part of a flipped classroom experience. Finally, (I LOVE this), when you go to “Send form,” you can now specify a shortened URL, eliminating the need to paste the long URL into goo.gl. Yay!

Google Tip #2: Did you know that you could use Google to “read” PDF files and turn them into text documents? Here’s how:

  1. Upload your PDF file to your Google drive
  2. Click in the box to the left of the uploaded file to select
  3. Click on More (at the top of your screen) and choose “Open with”
  4. Choose Google Docs
  5. Google will proceed to open your document. The beginning with have the image, and the digitized text will appear at the end of the document.

Now, it may not be perfect, and you may have to tweak it a little, but it beats retyping!

October 3, 2014 Posted by | Google, JEDcamp, Links You'll Love | , , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

This is just hysterical. Check out Shimon Peres’ plans for what to do after retirement:

I’m pretty sure I’ve mentioned this before, but I do want to remind everyone about Sefaria. Sefaria allows you to choose different texts – or portions thereof – and create a custom resource sheet. It’s still in development, so every text isn’t there, but it’s awesome nonetheless.

Shameless JEDcamp plug of the week. We are proud and excited that the second annual JEDcamp Midwest will be here on Sunday, October 19th from noon until 4:00 pm. There will be swag! There will be free lunch! There will be door prizes! There will be lots of great ideas to share! Need more incentive? Watch the terrific movie about last year’s JEDcamp:

Chrome tip #1: I’m a multi-tab user, which means I often have a dozen or so browser tabs open at one time. Some of them, like my mail and Schedulet, are tabs that I always, always use. I hate it when I accidentally close them by clicking on the little x. To remedy that, and to make the tabs take up less space, I “pin” them. To pin a tab, right-click (or hold down the control key and click) and choose Pin Tab. Like magic, the tab takes up, well, a pin-size amount of space and it can’t be closed accidentally. To unpin and remove a tab you’ll have to right-click again.

Chrome tip #2: If you love to use Chrome, check out these Chrome extensions that can make your user experience even better!

September 24, 2014 Posted by | Chrome, JEDcamp, Links You'll Love | , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Some of us spent a little time this summer talking about digital portfolios and how to implement them in class. This article expands on that quite nicely.

Here is a nice little Google docs cheat sheet you can print out and hang in your classroom.

Thinking about upgrading your iDevice to iOS 8? Here’s a list of privacy settings you should change immediately.

GAFE tip of the week: When you’re composing an email in Google mail, you can make it take up the whole screen rather than just that little puny spot in the corner. Just click on the little down arrow and choose Default to full screen.

September 19, 2014 Posted by | Links You'll Love | , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love – 8-29-14

Need to record a brief audio clip? Want your students to? Visit ClypIt, record your clip and get a link to share.

If you need some GIFs to explain mathematical concepts (and WHO doesn’t need those?) check out this website.

http://www.wordle.net is one of our favorite word cloud generators, but sometimes it gets cranky and stops working. This article has 9 more word cloud websites.

“Make it big, do it right, give it class…” Science teacher Steve Spangler’s science videos aim to do just that. Watch his videos here.

GAFE tip of the week: searching for a particular email message has gotten easier now that we’re using GAFE! Check out this article for tips on using Google search terms in Google Mail.

August 28, 2014 Posted by | Links You'll Love | | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Need a place on the web to quickly post graphics or information? Check out Tackk.

Should schools still be teaching cursive handwriting? This New York Times article explores the issue. Read more here.

GoSoapBox is another student response website (like Socrative or Nearpod). You create an “event,” and your students join using a computer or mobile device. You can embed quizzes, polls or discussions. There’s also a cool “confusion barometer” so you students can let you know if they’re stuck (could we have one of those in life, please?). Teachers can download graded spreadsheets or activity reports.

June 10, 2014 Posted by | Links You'll Love | | Leave a comment

What happens when you show kids an Apple II computer? Check it out:

For a fascinating look at how quickly data is generated on the Internet, check out The Internet in Real Time.

SAMR is a method of integrating technology into your teaching (SAMR – Substitution, Augmentation, Modification and Redefinition). This graphic takes apps and websites and arranges them in a way that helps you decide what is the best technology to use to achieve your goals. Love it!

More free art from The Metropolitan Museum of Art! Full size images! Copyright-free for non-commercial use!

The Yivo Institute has just released their digital archive featuring some fascinating artifacts from life in pre-Holocaust Poland. There are photos, amateur videos, audio clips and more. Access it here.

If you’ve used PowToon before with your class, take a moment to check out the changes. If you haven’t used it, give it a glance. PowToons are animated presentations – think PowerPoint with oomph. My 7th graders are using it right now, and I think they’re really enjoying it!

May 30, 2014 Posted by | Links, Links You'll Love | , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love – 5-16-14

The end is coming! Yes, folks, we are getting ready for the final days of school! Here are two great links for preparing end-of-year activities. Purpose games is a free site where you can create multi-choice games, image games and more. eQuizShow  is a site created by a student where you can create Jeopardy-like game shows.

If you have 15 minutes to spare, listen to this interview with Professor Elizabeth Lawley, and learn more about Rochester Institute of Technology’s efforts to introduce social gaming into the undergraduate experience. It’s just a fascinating experiment – and I think it could be modified for lots of other frameworks.

Teachers have long been using reflection activities such as exit slips, journaling and more. We just know that these techniques work! A new study finds we’re right (duh)! This article discusses the long-lasting merits of taking time to have your students reflect on their learning.

Okay – this is unique… Booktrack Classroom is a web service that allows your students (or you) to take a book or their own story and add a soundtrack. Basically it looks like you paste in your text and then add background music to enhance it. I like this a lot – I think it would be a fun end-of-year activity for your students! Learn more at Booktrack.

May 16, 2014 Posted by | Links You'll Love | | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Poster My Wall is a cool site to create a poster online. You can upload photos, customize the background and colors, and add text. You can download a basic quality image for free or order a printed poster.

There is absolutely no reason for This is Sand to exist, except that it’s really cool (and not a little zen) to be able to digitally “pour” sand onto your laptop screen and change the colors. Way cheaper than buying sand sculptures at the fair and no mess!

Wanna play a game? Check out National Geographic Kids. You can choose among geography games, action games, arcade games and more. Arcademics offers educational games (Demolition Division, anyone?) that are categorized by both subject and grade.

Go take a hike! Really! A recent Stanford study found that people are more creative while walking. Read more here.

For a while, it seemed like everyone was doing their own cover of the “Frozen” soundtrack. Well, finally, here it is… b’ivrit. Yup. You’re welcome.

If you want to quickly create a Jeopardy-like game show board to use with your student, check out FlipQuiz. The basic account is free and you can save your boards online.

Here’s a thought-provoking article at Te@chthought about the 22 things we currently do in education that will embarrass us in the future. I definitely don’t agree with all of them, but I think that it’s surely food for thought. Read more here.

Tal Fortgang is a freshman at Princeton University and is, by many accounts, an example of a young man who enjoys “being privileged.” He’s written a powerful essay about being middle-class, Jewish and white…and judged for it. Check it out here.

We love word cloud generators! You know, those fun applications that take a chunk of text and make it into a pretty picture where the most-often used words are bigger than the others… Here’s a great article that points you to ten – yes, ten – sites for creating word clouds, and gives you some neat ideas for using word clouds in the classroom.

If you’re thinking about flipping your classroom, check out hapyak, which allows you to add links and quizzes to videos.

There’s no question that the use of online video has grown exponentially over the last few years. The Pew Research has created a cool video on, well, video. Check it out here.

May 9, 2014 Posted by | Links You'll Love | | Leave a comment

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