MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

Adobe Voice

Crossposted from Behrman House’s Tech Tuesday email. Check out their great resources!

Kids love to tell stories. And teachers love an app that lets kids effortlessly choose photos or graphics, record their own stories and easily create an accompanying video.

Adobe Voice is free and surprisingly robust. The best thing about it is that it doesn’t get in your way – it’s simple and intuitive to use, doesn’t have a lot of unnecessary confusing features, and saves files in a format that you can easily share. Users can choose from a large variety of slide layouts, themes and music to enhance their stories. You can use the images that are in your personal camera roll, or you can search among Adobe Voice’s copyright-free image library (called “icons” in the app). There’s a nice selection of background music, too, or you can use music that’s already on your iPad.

Users need to use an Adobe ID (or sign in with Facebook credentials) to create Adobe Voice stories. You can sign up for an Adobe ID right in the app or do it via the adobe  website. Then, simply download Adobe Voice for your apple device. (Sorry – there’s no Android version right now.)

In Your Classroom

  • Have students bring in Jewish holiday family heirlooms and take photos of them holding them. Then, record the students talking about their object and how it’s important to their family.
  • Invite your students to retell a Bible story. Ask them to create between three and four drawing that depict important parts of that story. Then, use Adobe Voice to record students’ voices retelling the story to you, and add images of their drawing to accompany their telling.
  • Use Adobe Voice to create a tutorial for students struggling to learn how to pronounce prayers. Record yourself reciting the words to a prayer, and add imagery that relates to the meaning of the prayer.

March 4, 2015 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, iPads, Mobile devices and apps, Storytelling | , , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Emaze is a really slick online presentation tool. It feels (and looks) a little like Prezi, but presentations can be downloaded as PDF files, presentations or video. You can embed images, charts, video and sound, although you cannot record audio directly to an emaze presentation.

If you’re looking for resources to teach sight words, check out SightWords. You can create and print out flash cards, make games, and learn research-validated teaching methods.

Friday, March 13th is the fourth annual Digital Learning Day. The website for DLD has lots of resources to inspire you to participate.

Confused about the difference between suggesting, commenting and directly editing a shared Google doc? I’ve created a how-to – you can access it here.

February 27, 2015 Posted by | Links You'll Love | | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Stoodle is a new free online collaboration tool hosted by ck12.org. You can use the Stoodle collaborative whiteboard on any platform simply by launching a browser. There is no app to download, no account to sign up for, and no bill to pay. You can upload documents from your Google drive or computer, and use your device to take photos, or record audio or video.

JeopardyLabs is another entry in the “create your own Jeopardy-type game” category, and it’s a nice one. It’s simple to use, and there are a lot of games that you can choose from if you want to avoid creating your own.

If you’re looking for some new ideas on how to use the iPad in the classroom, check out this image. It starts with relatively simple ways to use the device – by consuming information – and moves to more complex models such as collaboration and creation. This is a good way to explore using the iPad to support Thoughtful Classroom dimensions.

I really love this one. This article explores thoughtful ways to approach integrating technology in education. This is a must read!

February 14, 2015 Posted by | Uncategorized | 2 Comments

There’s no app for good teaching

Tktchr:

This is a must-read for anyone interested in thoughtfully integrating technology in education.

Originally posted on ideas.ted.com:

See all articles in the series

8 ways to think about tech in ways that actually improve the classroom.

Bringing technology into the classroom often winds up an awkward mash-up between the laws of Murphy and Moore: What can go wrong, will — only faster.

It’s a multi-headed challenge: Teachers need to connect with classrooms filled with distinct individuals. We all want learning to be intrinsically motivated and mindful, yet we want kids to test well and respond to bribes (er, extrinsic rewards). Meanwhile, there’s a multi-billion-dollar industry, in the US alone, hoping to sell apps and tech tools to school boards.

There’s no app for that.

But there are touchstones for bringing technology into the classroom. With educational goals as the starting point, not an afterthought, teachers can help students use — and then transcend — technology as they learn.

Children as early as Pre-Kindergarten at Love T. Nolan Elementary School in College Park, Georgia have access to the iPad to reinforce techniques taught in the classroom. https://www.flickr.com/photos/116952757@N08/14161914543 Starting in pre-kindergarten, children at Love T. Nolan Elementary School in College Park, Georgia, have access to an iPad to reinforce techniques taught in the classroom. Photo by Amanda…

View original 1,587 more words

February 13, 2015 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

FakeiPhoneText and iFakeText are a simple little websites where you can enter text and the site will render an image that looks like it’s a text. This would be a great way for students to create fake texts between two historical characters. Ifaketext even lets you choose your carrier.

Need an easy way to create an animated video? Check out Explee. You can add images, text, music and voiceovers. Movies export to YouTube or can be downloaded.

Design thinking – tackling a problem at a deep level – is something you can do with your students at any grade level. This article gives some valuable tips on how to do it with iPads.

You know that there have been dozens of times when you thought, “if only I could create a Google form from this Google doc that I have…” If you install the Google add-on Doc to Form, you can do that! Check it out!

February 5, 2015 Posted by | Google, Links You'll Love | , , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

The Public Domain Project is another source for free public domain images and media files. Caution – this site also featured images that are available for purchase, so be sure to search using the search bar (not the category links at the top).

Interested in flipping your classroom? Here’s a nice post at with a video and an overview of tools you might find helpful.

Power Google Tip: Let’s say you share a Google document with your students or colleagues, but you want them to make a copy of it and then edit that one. You could certainly use Classroom for this, but here’s a great tip if you just want to do it through Google drive and not use Classroom. See the URL at the top of your document? Send that to your users, but change “edit” at the end to “copy.” You’ll still have to share it so your users can access it, but this way everyone will get a copy of your original in their own drive. See this post for more information.

January 30, 2015 Posted by | Google, Links You'll Love | , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Power Google Tip: Need to look something up or search for an image while working in Google docs on a computer (not iOS)? This is terrific – go to Tools > Research to open a Research pane. There you can search the dictionary, for an image, among quotes and more. You can even specify that you want to find images that are copyright free. Slick!

Movenote is a slick website where you can easily create movies. You can upload existing content like PDF files or jpgs, or you can record using the computer’s camera. You can link it with your Google account to access your Google drive docs, too. Movies can be shared, downloaded or embedded. There’s a free iOS app, too!

I still have nightmares about the time I was in charge of timing students during a Lag BaOmer relay race. I just couldn’t keep those kids straight! Clearly, I needed the Meeting Monopolizer app, which Daniel shared with me this week. You can read more about this 99 cent wonder here. It was originally designed to track which meeting-goer monopolizes your meetings, but apparently people have found more and more uses for it, including timing relays and tracking class participation.

January 23, 2015 Posted by | GAFE, Google | , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Everyone knows that formative assessment can be the key to delivering a lesson that every student “gets.” Vicki Davis addresses different ways to integrate formative assessment using technology in this Edutopia article.

Coggle is a quick way to create a mind map that you can save into your Google drive and share with others. Just sign in using your Google account, click and go!

I love me some copyright-free stuff! The Public Domain Review is a collection of images, books, films, audio and more that have fallen out of copyright and into the public domain, which makes them available for anyone (students, I’m looking at you) to remix, mash and use wherever and however they want.

Twisted Wave is a browser-based audio editor. A free account gives you one hour of storage for mono files. You can record using your computer mic or edit an existing audio file. Files can be downloaded or sent to Google drive. This is a Flash-based site, so it does not work on iOS devices.

Shoutout to Daniel for finding RefMe. Similar to EasyBib, RefMe is an online citation site. Its super-clean interface makes it very nice to use!

January 16, 2015 Posted by | Links You'll Love | | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Infographics are all the rage now, for good reason. And knowing how to translate written information into graphics is a great skill. Piktochart is a nice website for creating your own infographics, reports and presentations. Like many other sites, it offers both free and premium (meaning, they cost money) templates, but the free templates look really good.

Well, this is nice . . . MindMup gives you a free cloud-based space to create collaborative mind maps shared through Google! Very nice.

Have you fallen in love with Google Classroom and created fabulous original lessons using the platform? If your answer is yes, you could open your own Google Classroom store. Who knows? You could sell some stuff!

Flipquiz is another fun site to create a jeopardy-type game. Create a category, add your questions, and go. This would be terrific for students to use!

Plenty of you are discovering that Google is a great place to create graphic organizers, especially if you want to share them with your students. The AppsUserGroup has a bunch of awesome templates you can download for free.

OOOOOOH – this is beautiful. If you want to create a really slick timeline (or have your students create them . . . ), check out Timeline JS. You begin with a Google spreadsheet listing the event, dates, text and links to any online media like movies or photos, and Timeline JS will create a timeline for you.

This is the coolest thing . . . what would happen if you poured molten aluminum in an abandoned ant colony? I know that you’ve wondered that often. Well, now you don’t have to wonder any more, thanks to AntHill Art. The videos are very cool, and would be terrific to share with students who are interested in what an ant colony actually looks like. All those little tunnels!

December 19, 2014 Posted by | Google, Links You'll Love | , | 1 Comment

Augmented Reality

A is for . . . Augmented Reality. What’s augmented reality and why use in education? Augmented reality is just adding a digital layer of information over the physical world. Using a device of some kind, like an iPad, a user views something that exists in the physical world (like a piece of paper, a building, or a magazine ad), but sees more. Imagine being able to view a building and see what it looked like 100 years ago? Or scanning a photo of a person and then seeing a movie where he or she is speaking? There are some terrific apps that take advantage of augmented reality – here are just a few:

  • ColARMix. Download and color the coloring pages from the ColAR website and then view them using the ColAR Mix app on an iPad. You can even pick up the items!
  • Aurasma: Aurasma is considered by many people to be the granddaddy of augmented reality apps. It’s actually pretty easy to use – just create your content (what you want people to see via the device), take a photo of the trigger (what you want people to scan), and layer the two. Then, when people view the trigger via the app, they’ll see the content you created!
  • AR Flashcards: With AR Flashcards, you point your device at the printed flashcard, and a 3D image will appear. You can even tap on the image to hear its name and get more information.
  • ARISGames. ARIS, in development at the University of Wisconsin, gives developers the ability to create digital scavenger hunts that can be played remotely or on location. See this post to find out more about Purim about three years ago when I developed a scavenger hunt that allowed students to converse with Esther and Mordecai. If you want more information about ARIS, please see me (or take my workshop at the upcoming ICE Conference).

How could you use augmented reality in class? What about recording raps to teach vocabulary words that appear when the word is scanned on a word wall? Or book trailers that play when you scan the cover of a book? How about recording yourself giving instructions to complete an exercise when an assignment is scanned?

December 9, 2014 Posted by | Augmented Reality | , , | Leave a comment

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