MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

Links You’ll Love

Here’s a really powerful video about bullying created by a 7th grader.

I know that I’ve written about FreeRice.com before, but I wanted to remind everyone about this great site. For every question your students answer correctly, FreeRice.com donates 10 grains of rice. You can even choose now from a variety of subjects.

Another reminder: don’t forget about GoNoodle! It’s a great site with lots of movement break videos. You do have to sign up for a free account.

From the good folks at Google: Google Maps Street View Treks lets users see what life is like from the road, in full panorama. And you can check out some really amazing sites like the Great Barrier Reef, the pyramids in Egypt and the Eiffel Tower. So cool!

August 25, 2016 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Sketchnoting at Camp

Here are some more samples of my continuing quest to become a sketchnoter. While spending two weeks at an overnight camp is a departure from the typical sketchnote-worthy activity, I thought it would be a good place to practice. Still loving the process!

IMG_1655IMG_1656IMG_1659IMG_1664

July 21, 2016 Posted by | Sketchnoting | , , | Leave a comment

Sketchnoting at ISTE

One of my goals for my time at the ISTE Conference was to practice sketchnoting on the iPad Pro using the Apple Pencil and the Paper app. I had a great time doing it! I found that I was significantly less distracted when sketchnoting than if I was typing into a word processor, and thoroughly engaged (even though I was internally debating over which color to shade the box and how large to make the title).

I also attended two great sketchnoting sessions. One was presented by Matt Miller and the other was a panel facilitated by Vicki Davis and featured Kathy Schrock, Sylvia Duckworth and Carrie Baughcum talking about how they got started sketchnoting, how they use it with their students, and about some favorite resources.

My first attempts at sketchnoting during the conference appear below, in reverse order. I feel like I can already see how I improved, and that was just in a couple of days. Check back for more attempts (sketchnoting at URJ Camp Newman, anyone?) and for my thoughts on how I’ll teach this to actual students this fall.

Sketchnoting in Education session:

ISTE - 6

Using Games, Play, Digital Media to Build Your Own Maker Culture session:

ISTE - 7

Matt Miller’s Sketchnotes: Tools and Tactics for Visual Notetaking Session:

ISTE - 3

Sketchnoting Exercise from Matt’s session:

ISTE - 4

Innovation and Tradition in Jewish Education Jewish Educators’ Network

ISTE - 5

Innovative Learning Spaces session:

ISTE - 1

June 30, 2016 Posted by | ISTE, Sketchnoting | , , , , | 2 Comments

Learn with Me: Quilling

I’m excited to be an artist in residence at Camp Newman this summer. First, I’m looking forward to the experience of using a different side of my brain for a couple of weeks. Second (really first, but I’m trying to contain myself), I’m super excited to be with my favorite associate camp director (and my favorite youngest daughter), Rabbi Allie Fischman.

I’m teaching something we’re calling quilligraphy. That’s a made up word. We’re combining calligraphy and quilling into a new art form. I’ll be teaching the kids how to do Hebrew and English calligraphy using markers (’cause I’m not really up to using dip pens, although I may bring some for them to play with).

Then we’ll be learning something called quilling. Quilling is a really old form where you take thin strips of paper and curl them around to form a filigree design.

There are a lot of really awesome links online to learn about quilling – visit my Pinterest board for a great start.

Each child will get a two-headed quilling tool, a cork board to work on, a plastic bag to hold their supplies, and a bottle of glue. I’ve laminated a bunch of paper 6-inch rulers, and created circle templates. I bought combs at the dollar store so the kids can do this:

So my plan is for the kids to learn to quill and then combine calligraphy with quilling. Options for that will include:

  • Quilling a border for your calligraphy
  • Writing out a word in calligraphy and then filling it in with quilling
  • Embellishing your calligraphy with quilling

Should be interesting!

May 24, 2016 Posted by | Learn with me, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Sketchnoting, continued

I was fortunate enough, earlier this week, to attend the closing colloquium for the Teachers Institute I staffed this year. We combined with a second Institute – the Teachers Institute for the Arts, staffed by the fabulous Elyssa Moss Rabinowitz and David Moss of Kol Haot.

During the colloquium, Tim and Jenny from Creative Connections live sketched the event. They live sketched the opening workshop for the Teachers Institute for the Arts last summer, so the participants in that program were familiar with their work.

This just blew me away! This is very similar to sketchnoting, although it’s more a reporting than a processing of the information. I love it, though!

A few tips from Tim:

  • Most text goes into containers
  • Containers can “layer,” that is, appear to be under or over one another
  • Use color
  • Don’t use visual clichés

Watching Tim and Jenny work during the colloquium was fascinating, and made me want to pursue sketchnoting even more.

And speaking of pursuing sketchnoting more…

Sketchnote Army is a great resource if you’re looking to learn more about sketchnoting as is their new podcast. I listened to episode one on my commutes yesterday and today (I have a short drive!), and the info was just great!

Also – I’ve found this post to be a great resource. And this one, too.

 

 

May 20, 2016 Posted by | Sketchnoting, Uncategorized | , , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

There’s a great article about the Spheros in the New Yorker this week. There are lots of lesson plans to integrate these little guys in your curriculum – let me know if you want to explore. We’re really enjoying using them!

It’s not a short read, but this post says a lot about iPads, research about their effectiveness in education, and what it means to us. Very interesting!

May 20, 2016 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Now that the yoms are behind us, Memorial Day looms… here are some great resources for teaching about that holiday.

For easy to understand videos about the physical world and how we can better understand it, check out PBS’ Physics Girl videos.

Who loves Google Slides? Here are some great ways to use Slides besides just for presentations.

May 13, 2016 Posted by | Links You'll Love | , | Leave a comment

Learn with me: sketchnoting

I’m starting a new feature called “learn with me.” I realized that, more than anything else, I’m curious. About everything.

As a child, I was constantly reading. I remember not being able to eat breakfast unless the cereal box (now, there’s some fascinating literature) was sitting in front of me so I could read it. Of course, that was before the Internet. Now, I find myself eating dinner in front of the TV, with my iPad or phone in front of me. I realize that’s not what a nutritionist would suggest, but it’s perfect for a lifelong learner.

Anyway, whenever people ask me what I love most about my job, my answer typically is that there’s always something new to learn. I rarely do things the same way twice. In fact, the best part of repeating something you did before is figuring out how to improve on last year’s effort.

So one of the things I’ve been learning about is sketchnoting. Sketchnoting is essentially taking notes but doing it in an interesting visual manner; incorporating images (like icons), color and other diagramming tools. For instance, Sir Ken Robinson’s TED talk accompanied by the RSA animation is a professional and incredibly powerful example of sketchnoting:

We will be getting a cart of iPad Pros next year with Apple Pencils, so I have been studying the whole sketchnoting field and figuring out how to teach it to my 7th and 8th grade students next year. Why sketchnoting on an iPad?

First, I figure the iPad app Paper will be a terrific way for the students to be able to combine sketching with using the iPad. Paper is a great app, and there are lots of ways that students will be able to use it. The advantage to using the iPad for sketchnoting is that electronic sketchnotes can easily be shared and tagged for reference.

Thoughts about teaching students to sketchnote:

The first is the “why.” I’ll start with why we take notes, and how studies are showing that taking notes using your hand is more effective than typing them.

The second will be to learn how to use Paper and the stylus. There are a number of terrific tutorials here. Then we’ll have the students create their own drawings using the app.

Next, we will work on learning how to actually sketchnote. This will be the tricky part – kids need to learn how to LISTEN and figure out what the important stuff is (which is why taking notes by hand rather than trying to just transcribe everything they hear). I think this will be the hard part, but certainly the most beneficial. There are several lessons plans online that incorporate sketchnoting:

Third grade sketchnoting

2nd graders go wild for sketchnoting

Visual narrative meets note taking

I think it will be helpful to find some TED talks that are of interest to the specific grade level, and practice sketchnoting to those, before using them in an actual class. In fact – that’s what I’m doing to hone my sketchnoting skills.

The other thing that I’ll do with my students is have them develop their own library of images (ideas, important connections, for more information, etc.) and then put them on the side of a drawing (like a key). Then, they can use that drawing as a template for each of their subsequent sketchnotes. That way, they don’t have to figure out how to redraw an image over and over; they can just select and copy it to wherever they need it when they’re doing the actual sketchnote.

I’m excited to try sketchnoting! Stay tuned!

May 10, 2016 Posted by | iPads, Learn with me, Sketchnoting | , , , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Brains On! is a science podcast for children with the motto “we’re serious about being curious.” Each Brains On! episode seeks to answer a question posed at the start—How do you catch a cold? Why does tickling make you laugh? What makes paint stick?—through a series of interviews.

The Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz has developed MathScienceMusic.org, a website that offers teachers resources and apps to use music as a vehicle to teach other academic lessons.

May 6, 2016 Posted by | Links You'll Love | | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

My word is nitpick – what’s yours? The Oxford English Dictionary (otherwise known as the OED) has an awesome site where you can find which words started the same time you did. This is great fun – and could be useful for students’ autobiographies (Lynn and Carol – I’m looking at you).

July 21 and 22 there is a virtual conference (meaning it’s delivered online) focused on STEAM and Arts Integration. STEAM stands for science, technology, engineering, arts and math. The conference is virtual, which means all the sessions and handouts are delivered over the Internet. The sessions will be presented live on July 21 and 22, and will be available by demand through July 21, 2017 (that’s a year, people). For more information about the presentations, visit the website at http://artsintegrationconference.com/. I’m offering to host an in-person gathering for my colleagues who want to attend the live sessions – sounds like fun!

If you’re looking for something to learn over spring break (or beyond), check out the Adobe Education Exchange. You can join for free, and they have a lot of self-paced workshops or collaborative courses. You can search by standard, grade or by product.

April 15, 2016 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

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