MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

visme

The Technology: Visme

Everybody knows that old quote about how many words a picture is worth. It’s true! And with the website Visme, you can create your own infographics and other visually based content easily. 

You can build your infographic using the images that Visme provides, including layouts, shapes, text, graphs and backgrounds. Or, you can choose to upload your own images. It also allows you to insert video or music into your infographics.

When you’re finished designing your image, you can download a watermarked low-resolution .jpg and embed your infographic on a website or share it on social media for free. (Higher resolution images without Visme’s branding are available with a premium account).

Sign up for a free account at Visme.

In Your Classroom

  • An infographic is a terrific alternative assessment to allow students to “show what they know.” For example, ask them to create an infographic that displays the meaning of the four questions.
  • Do give students sufficient time to carefully plan an infographic that actually presents meaningful data.
  • Infographics are terrific for illustrating the flow of any tefillah service, or the seder.
  • Timelines are a natural activity for history classrooms. Ask them to start from Joseph, and end with Moses parting the sea.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

March 28, 2017 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Wizer

The Technology: Wizer

Wizer is a free website that can help you create beautifully designed digital worksheets and share them easily with your students. They can be created and completed using any device that has web access. 

You can customize your worksheets by choosing its design and giving it a title. Then simply add your own content, such as open questions, or matching, multiple choice, and fill in the blank questions. You can also add audio clips, videos or web links to your questions. Hebrew is supported, too.

Once you have designed your worksheet, you can easily share it with your students via any learning management system, such as Google classroom. They can complete it on their devices, and send it back to you digitally as well. Finally, Wizer will also quickly assess student’s responses for understanding. Alternatively, you can choose to check each sheet one by one and provide individualized feedback to your students.

Sign up for a free account, and watch an introductory video about Wizer here.

In Your Classroom

  • Wizer can be used anywhere a traditional worksheet would be used. Fill-in-the-blanks, matching and multiple choice questions are all familiar ways to check for mastery.
  • Wizer is a great way to present a video or website to your students for feedback.
  • Think beyond the classroom. Wizer worksheets can be used to collect responses from anyone in your community.
This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

March 26, 2017 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Want to get started with digital storytelling in your classroom? Here are some great places to begin. And for a moving example, check out this BBC “choose your own escape” site regarding the Syrian refugee crisis.

Here’s an article about literacy, illiteracy, and a movement to make sure that smartphones don’t outpace humans in the area of intelligence over the next decade.

March 17, 2017 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Digital storytelling | , | Leave a comment

Getting Feedback in Real Time

Soliciting audience feedback while giving a lecture can help teachers better understand their audience and help them tweak their presentations to fit.. 

These free, technology based tools can help you easily poll your audience for their thoughts:

Poll Everywhere: Poll Everywhere is one of the oldest audience participation tools and it remains a favorite of presenters and teachers. Using the app, you simply ask your audience a question. Audience members then answer using the app or by navigating to a specific URL on their own devices. Poll Everywhere will then assemble their responses and display them visually in a custom bar chart.

Poll Everywhere is available via a browser or iOS app, and you can embed polls in Keynote, PowerPoint or Google Slide presentations. Sign up for free for a K-12 account. You can display up to 40 responses per poll.  If you’d like to be able to display more responses, you can do so with a paid account.

Google Slides offers your audience members the ability to submit questions, and then vote on which questions they are most interested in learning the answers to. To launch it, enter presenter view from your slideshow, and click “new” under Audience Tools. A URL will appear where your audience members can submit their questions. For a more detailed explanation of this feature, visit EdSurge here.

In Your Classroom

  • Anonymous polling is a good way to get feedback from your students, including those that might be shy about participating.
  • Keep your polls simple. They can be a powerful way to solicit feedback, but only if they are simple and easy to understand.
  • Be sure to understand the limitations of free accounts. There’s nothing more frustrating than users trying to weigh in and finding out that the limit has been exceeded.
This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

March 16, 2017 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

I just taught a workshop on sketchnoting at the ICE conference. Here’s the link to a folder containing my presentation and supporting materials, if you’re interested. Let me know, also, if you’d be interested in coming to “sketchnote camp” this summer – I’m thinking one morning a week for a couple of hours.

Tumble Science podcast for kids tells the stories of science discoveries. You can listen in your browser, or subscribe via iTunes.

The Jewish Education Project has a new website – and it’s packed! While some of their programs are specifically for the New York area, there’s much here that is of interest to other communities.

March 3, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

Marvel Comic Creator 

Just like its name suggests, Marvel Comic Creator is a free website gives you the tools to create your own comics using the Marvel superhero characters. You get to choose if you want to make a comic strip or a comic book, as well as how many panels you’d like to work with. Then, you can select from a list of characters, backgrounds and objects and place them into the scene. After that you just need to type in your own dialogue and you will be a comics creator!

Note that the image options are somewhat limited, and you can only work with what the site offers. So, as you can see in the strip below, we went with a teddy bear to represent a mishloach manot package since there were no food images!

But it can be fun to tinker with, and the final comics you create can be printed, downloaded or embedded onto other websites or emails.

In Your Classroom

  • Comics can be a really good way to have students summarize information or display knowledge.
  • If you’re creating a handout for your students, consider having a short comic panel as an introductory image or cover to add a little interest.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

February 28, 2017 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Here are some more creative ways teachers are using to teach about fake news.

Love this making mensches periodic table graphic! It would be great as a poster (hint, hint)…

I taught sketchnoting (visual note-taking) to a number of 7th and 8th graders this week. It was so interesting to hear their thoughts about handwriting. I found this terrific blog post about the value of taking notes in longhand and effective note-taking.

February 24, 2017 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Screencasting

The Technology: Screencasting

Screencasting software allows you to create videos that your students can watch anywhere. It also makes student-created videos a possibility without having to use any equipment other than a computer. Screencasting software is available for all operating systems and much of it is free.

Here are some of the most popular options:

-Screencast-o-matic: One of the oldest screencasting websites, Screencast-o-matic is free for a basic account. If you would like to make longer videos or have access to some of the more advanced editing tools, the  premium account costs  $15/year. Note: You may need to download and install a screencast launcher in order to use the website.

Quicktime: If you have a Macintosh computer, you probably already have Quicktime, it often is included upon purchase. To create a new screen recording, just locate the application on your computer and go to File > New Screen Recording. The application will ask if you want to record just part or all of your screen. Choose, and then hit the record button and go!

-Screencastify or SnagIt extensions: If you use the Google Chrome browser on a laptop or Chromebook, you can install Screencastify or SnagIt extensions. You will need to give the extensions permission to access your computer’s camera and microphone, and you may have to designate where you will want screen recordings saved.

In Your Classroom

  1. Have students screencast to demonstrate reading mastery of Hebrew texts or liturgy.
  2. Planning for a substitute teacher? Record a screencast to leave directions for your students.
  3. Be sure to plan your screencast just like you would a play or any other video. Write a script or create a storyboard to ensure proper flow.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

February 21, 2017 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Here’s a list of over 150 websites of interest to lifelong learners. Definitely something for everyone!

Khan Academy has introduced an exploration of the storytelling process. They partnered with an exceptional source, too – Pixar Studios. Check out the course here.

We don’t know exactly what jobs of the future our students will hold, but we do know that educating kids to be problem-seeking design-thinking adults will serve them well. Ewan Mcintosh has a thoughtful blog post here where he addresses that. He has a good TED Talk about it, too.

 

February 17, 2017 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , , , | Leave a comment

Hyperdocs

The Technology: Hyperdocs

If you’ve made a commitment to use more technology in your classroom this year, Hyperdocs is a good way to begin. While encouraging and supporting technology use, it still puts educational goals front and center.

What is a Hyperdoc?

A Hyperdoc is a Google Doc that allows teachers to use the structure provided by a Google Doc to create lessons with engaging media, visual appeal, inquiry learning and opportunities for collaboration. Basically, it’s like an old-time worksheet, but with superior, 21st century tools.  With one simple link, students can access a Hyperdoc that contains instructions, links, tasks, multi-media and many more innovative features that can help get kids engaged and thinking.

How can I learn more about Hyperdocs?

The Hyperdocs website has great information and resources, including sample Hyperdocs, templates, a how-to tutorial, and links to Pinterest board collections of Hyperdocs. You can also check out the Hyperdocs YouTube playlist for some great explanatory videos.

How do I make my own Hyperdoc?

The easiest way to make your first Hyperdoc is to use one of the sample lesson plans on their website, and customize it for your own content. This basic lesson-plan template, for instance, details each part of a lesson (exploration, application, and sharing, for example), and gives suggestions for each step.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

February 14, 2017 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, G Suite (GAFE), Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

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