MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

TodaysMeet

TodaysMeet is a private, digital chatroom that teachers can use to encourage student participation. It allows students to share their ideas to the entire class by typing in their comments that are then projected onto a board where everyone can see them. This allows for a back and forth discussion in which  even the quietest of students are able to easily contribute their thoughts.

To set up a chatroom, simply go to TodaysMeet and pick a name for your room. You don’t need to create an account, but it’s free to do so, and creating one will give you the ability to moderate content. 

Once your room is set up, you can give your students the TodaysMeet URL and they’ll be able to type their comments or questions right into the message box. Comments are limited to 140 characters, so brevity is a must! You can keep a room open for up to a year, and close your room at any time.

In Your Classroom

  • While watching a documentary or other non-fiction video, check for understanding by asking your students to comment and answer questions about what they are watching.
  • Take a poll. Ask your students a question such as, “What’s your favorite Jewish holiday?” and watch their answers appear. 
  • TodaysMeet can also be a helpful tool in faculty or committee meetings.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

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January 21, 2017 - Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , ,

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