MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

Do you want to build a (virtual) sukkah?

Screen Shot 2019-05-15 at 12.26.19 PMYes, I know it’s May.

I’m already starting to think about we’re going to use VR/AR next year and authentically connect it to general or Judaic studies. Our fourth grade does a wonderful project where they design a sukkah, reduce its proportions in math and then create a 3D design using Tinkercad which we print. So what comes next?

I’d like to have my fifth graders use CoSpaces to create a virtual sukkah to which they can add elements like the brachot, lulav and etrog models, and then do some creative coding. Could they have lights? Could they wave the lulav? Make a blessing?

CoSpaces is my choice because it’s easy to get the basics down but really limitless in terms of coding. It’s reasonably priced and you can set up classes and assign spaces to groups of kids so they’re working collaboratively but simultaneously. That wasn’t exactly intuitive to figure out and I plan to have another post about exactly how to do that.

CoSpaces has building materials but there was nothing that was lattice-like for a sukkah. I was able to create one in Tinkercad, though, and import it. You can also use Blender or SketchUp, but I was going for quick and easy at this time.

Here’s the space so far if you want to play. More to come.

May 15, 2019 Posted by | Augmented Reality, virtual reality | , , , , | Leave a comment

Augmented Reality

A is for . . . Augmented Reality. What’s augmented reality and why use in education? Augmented reality is just adding a digital layer of information over the physical world. Using a device of some kind, like an iPad, a user views something that exists in the physical world (like a piece of paper, a building, or a magazine ad), but sees more. Imagine being able to view a building and see what it looked like 100 years ago? Or scanning a photo of a person and then seeing a movie where he or she is speaking? There are some terrific apps that take advantage of augmented reality – here are just a few:

  • ColARMix. Download and color the coloring pages from the ColAR website and then view them using the ColAR Mix app on an iPad. You can even pick up the items!
  • Aurasma: Aurasma is considered by many people to be the granddaddy of augmented reality apps. It’s actually pretty easy to use – just create your content (what you want people to see via the device), take a photo of the trigger (what you want people to scan), and layer the two. Then, when people view the trigger via the app, they’ll see the content you created!
  • AR Flashcards: With AR Flashcards, you point your device at the printed flashcard, and a 3D image will appear. You can even tap on the image to hear its name and get more information.
  • ARISGames. ARIS, in development at the University of Wisconsin, gives developers the ability to create digital scavenger hunts that can be played remotely or on location. See this post to find out more about Purim about three years ago when I developed a scavenger hunt that allowed students to converse with Esther and Mordecai. If you want more information about ARIS, please see me (or take my workshop at the upcoming ICE Conference).

How could you use augmented reality in class? What about recording raps to teach vocabulary words that appear when the word is scanned on a word wall? Or book trailers that play when you scan the cover of a book? How about recording yourself giving instructions to complete an exercise when an assignment is scanned?

December 9, 2014 Posted by | Augmented Reality | , , | Leave a comment

   

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