MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

Links You’ll Love

This article has some great tips for using Google extensions in the classroom.

The Chrome music lab has all sorts of fun music experiments. You can explore rhythm, melodies, soundwaves and more.

We do a lot of prototyping in the innovation studio: creating, critiquing and revising are a natural part of what happens when you’re creating for the 3D printer or Silhouette cutter. For more on design thinking in the classroom, see this article.

Advertisements

April 13, 2018 Posted by | Links You'll Love | , , , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Tizmos is a site that’s similar to Symbaloo, where you can create a visual landing page for your students with easy-to-use links to often-used websites.

Jewish Learning Matters is a website with tons of resources for educators. It’s a project from the Miami School of Education and Social Work. Check it out!

March 23, 2018 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Google Keep

Google Keep gives Google users an online space for note keeping, image saving, and more. You can make lists (complete with checkboxes), save images or even draw. The interface is intuitive and looks like a bulletin board with color-coded notes that you can move around with your mouse.  Google Keep also gives users the ability to:

  • add collaborators
  • set a timer to receive reminders about a note
  • send notes to Google Docs
  • read a photo of a printed document and extract the text

If you have a Google account, you have access to Google Keep.

In Your Classroom

  • Google Keep is a great way to organize research. It’s highly visual, and it makes it simple to arrange and rearrange text.
  • Want to transfer your Google Keep notes into a Google document? Just go to Tools > Keep to access your notepad and drag applicable items to the Google document..
  • Collaborating on a big project? Use Google Keep to make lists, assign tasks and set reminders.
  • Since Google Keep is on the web, it’s synced across devices, and is  accessible at school and at home.
  • Like using Google Keep? Consider installing the Chrome extension. It will making it easier to save web content such as images or text within Google Keep.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

March 20, 2018 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Google Sites

Google Sites is an application that you can use to build your own website. It has intuitive tools and options that allow you to customize your site and design it in exactly the way you want.

If you’re familiar with Google Forms, you’ll note the similarity in the tools and options right away. There’s a menu that pops up on the right, and allows you to click and easily add text, images, Google docs and forms, YouTube videos, calendars and map locations to your site. You can also select from several design themes which will assign a specific look and set of font choices to your website.

Like all other Google products, options for collaboration are built into Google Sites, and you can easily share your site with others and work together to build it.

When you’re done designing your website, click on “Publish” to get your site on the web and to see the URL. You can even preview how your site will look on phones, tablets and laptops.

In Your Classroom

  • Google Sites makes it easy for students to collaboratively create websites. It even supports multiple editors working at the same time.
  • If you have a number of Google docs to share with colleagues, consider creating a website with them posted on it. Having your materials on a website will make them easily accessible and all in one place. Just share the URL with those you would like to see the documents. Also, when you click “Publish,” be sure to check “Request public search engines to not display my site” so that your site will not appear in search engine results.
  • Create a website about your class. Post images of projects, student work, and schedules of upcoming events, and share the URL with parents.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

March 13, 2018 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Dogo is a website that supports kids and teachers “engaging positively with current events, books, and movies.”

We Are Teachers has some great Pi Day activities – and they’re not all just for math class!

Google Arts & Culture has partnered with the British Library to bring the magic of Harry Potter to the classroom. This online version of a Harry Potter exhibit includes the series’ original illustrations, a history of witchcraft and wizardry, fantastical beasts, and much more. You can view over 190 items and 10 exhibits right on the Google Arts & Culture site. Step aboard the Hogwarts Express here.

March 9, 2018 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

The Librarians’ Internet Index is amazing! This is a searchable, free, curated list of websites maintained by, well, librarians. The site has links to a number of reliable databases as well.

Need some newspaper templates your students can use with Google Docs? Check these out.

Google Sheets is pretty useful, but did you know you could also use it to create flashcards, Bingo cards and more? Head over to Flippity for some great tools, demos and instructions.

March 7, 2018 Posted by | Links You'll Love | , , | Leave a comment

Tes Teach

Tes Teach (formerly known as Blendspace) is a free website and app that provides tools that can help you create interactive, digital lessons. By dragging-and-dropping, you can easily combine web content with your own files into one digital presentation.

If your content can be digital, then it can be included in your lesson: YouTube videos, quizzes, website links PDFs, photos from your photo library, Dropbox files, Google Drive files—all of these and more can be assembled into a lesson using Tes Teach.

Once your lesson is complete, you can easily share your Tes Teach lessons via social media or by link. You create the lessons using your regular computer, and students can view them via computer or via personal devices by downloading the accompanying, free iOS or Android app.

Tes Teach also has a library of many lessons that have already been created by other educators, and they are there for you to access and share with your students. There are even many lessons about Jewish subjects as well.

To begin, sign up for a free account. This will give you access to the Tes Teach digital dashboard.

In Your Classroom

  • Tes Teach is a great way to share student-created videos with the class
  • Tes Teach lessons is an excellent tool for use in a flipped classroom, or for set induction lessons.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

March 6, 2018 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Booksnap

Booksnaps can be a fun way for students to share their thoughts about books or texts.

Students can  create a booksnap by taking a photo of the text that they are reading, and then adding their own thoughts, drawings and comments to the image. They can underline text, circle text, and add emojis and other doodles to the image to illustrate their thoughts and questions about the text.

Educator Tara Martin, who created the idea of book snaps, had her students use Snapchat to create their book snaps, but you can use other tools as well. (get it?  booksnap = book + snap). For example, PicCollage Kids is a safe, kid-friendly photo editor that can be downloaded for $1.99, and Google Draw is another good choice.

Booksnaps are meant to be shared among classmates to facilitate discussion, and students should be aware when creating them that they will be shared. Booksnaps can be shared using many different tools such as Padlet or Seesaw.

In Your Classroom

  • Booksnaps can be  a great way to have students reflect on the siddur. Ask each student to create a booknap about the sh’ma, and share them with one another.
  • Learning about Purim? Invite students to make a booksnap from a piece of the Megillah.
  • You can learn more about techniques for using Booksnaps in the classroom here:

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

February 27, 2018 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , | 1 Comment

Green Screen

Green Screen is an easy-to-use, ios app that enables users to make their own videos with simple “green screen” effects. Green screen effects are used in the movies to make it look like the actors are in an exotic location (when they are really in a Hollywood studio) or to make it look like a weather announcers are standing in front of a weather map (when they are really standing in front a blank, green screen).

All you need is the app and a green screen and you can create images that show your students anywhere you choose! And that green screen doesn’t need to be expensive; I’ve had terrific results using a green plastic tablecloth from the dollar store taped to the wall.

The app creates the effect by combining images from multiple sources into a single video. Just shoot your video (or take a photo) from within the app. Then, add your desired background, and the app will insert it in place of the green screen.  The result will be an image of your students standing inside ancient Israel, the shuk, or even on the moon!

The app costs $2.99. For more information on using the app, head over to Do Ink’s support site.

In Your Classroom

  • Feature a green screen booth at your Purim carnival! Pick a series of fun backgrounds and invite participants put on character costumes, and appear in a scene with their friends.
  • The app looks for green, so it’s a good idea to caution your students to avoid wearing green when recording (or they could disappear altogether!).
  • Think beyond the background – if your background photo is a person,  then your image can look like you are meeting  with that person. Try  having your students pose standing next to Mordecai or Esther.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

February 20, 2018 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Slideshows

It happens to everyone! You take lots and lots of great photos and then drop the ball when it’s time to get the slideshow together. Not to worry! Here are some easy and inexpensive tools that can help you make slideshows quickly and easily:

Google Slides/ Slides toolbox

The Google add-on Slides Toolbox is a big time saver for importing your photos into a Google Slides presentation. First, upload your photos to Google, and
install the Slides Toolbox. Then, launch Google Slides. Finally, within Google Slides, go to Add-ons > Slides Toolbox, and click on “Import Tools”. Locate the folder that holds your photos, and Slides Toolbox will import your photos and place one on each slide. When you are done, save your Google Slides presentation and you’ll get a shareable URL that links to your finished slideshow.

Animoto

Animoto is another tool that you can use to also make a slideshow from your uploaded photos. You can choose a theme, select a soundtrack from Animoto’s music library, or, upload your own music. Once you’re finished making your slideshow, you can download a low-resolution version at no cost or choose from higher resolution options for a fee. Animoto slideshows are really attractive and well worth the cost.  Educators can apply for a classroom account here.

Adobe Spark 

Adobe Spark Video is a free iOS app that is a great resource for creating slideshows using the photos on your device along with a voice-over recording. Download the app, and create an account (or sign in with your Facebook credentials) to begin.

In Your Classroom

Make slideshows:

  • For an end-of-year presentation
  • At the beginning of the year, showing each student holding up a sign stating their, “wishes for the new school year.”
  • To document a class trip
  • To use as a portfolio of student work.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

January 23, 2018 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: