MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

Links You’ll Love

I just taught a workshop on sketchnoting at the ICE conference. Here’s the link to a folder containing my presentation and supporting materials, if you’re interested. Let me know, also, if you’d be interested in coming to “sketchnote camp” this summer – I’m thinking one morning a week for a couple of hours.

Tumble Science podcast for kids tells the stories of science discoveries. You can listen in your browser, or subscribe via iTunes.

The Jewish Education Project has a new website – and it’s packed! While some of their programs are specifically for the New York area, there’s much here that is of interest to other communities.

March 3, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

Marvel Comic Creator 

Just like its name suggests, Marvel Comic Creator is a free website gives you the tools to create your own comics using the Marvel superhero characters. You get to choose if you want to make a comic strip or a comic book, as well as how many panels you’d like to work with. Then, you can select from a list of characters, backgrounds and objects and place them into the scene. After that you just need to type in your own dialogue and you will be a comics creator!

Note that the image options are somewhat limited, and you can only work with what the site offers. So, as you can see in the strip below, we went with a teddy bear to represent a mishloach manot package since there were no food images!

But it can be fun to tinker with, and the final comics you create can be printed, downloaded or embedded onto other websites or emails.

In Your Classroom

  • Comics can be a really good way to have students summarize information or display knowledge.
  • If you’re creating a handout for your students, consider having a short comic panel as an introductory image or cover to add a little interest.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

February 28, 2017 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Here are some more creative ways teachers are using to teach about fake news.

Love this making mensches periodic table graphic! It would be great as a poster (hint, hint)…

I taught sketchnoting (visual note-taking) to a number of 7th and 8th graders this week. It was so interesting to hear their thoughts about handwriting. I found this terrific blog post about the value of taking notes in longhand and effective note-taking.

February 24, 2017 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Screencasting

The Technology: Screencasting

Screencasting software allows you to create videos that your students can watch anywhere. It also makes student-created videos a possibility without having to use any equipment other than a computer. Screencasting software is available for all operating systems and much of it is free.

Here are some of the most popular options:

-Screencast-o-matic: One of the oldest screencasting websites, Screencast-o-matic is free for a basic account. If you would like to make longer videos or have access to some of the more advanced editing tools, the  premium account costs  $15/year. Note: You may need to download and install a screencast launcher in order to use the website.

Quicktime: If you have a Macintosh computer, you probably already have Quicktime, it often is included upon purchase. To create a new screen recording, just locate the application on your computer and go to File > New Screen Recording. The application will ask if you want to record just part or all of your screen. Choose, and then hit the record button and go!

-Screencastify or SnagIt extensions: If you use the Google Chrome browser on a laptop or Chromebook, you can install Screencastify or SnagIt extensions. You will need to give the extensions permission to access your computer’s camera and microphone, and you may have to designate where you will want screen recordings saved.

In Your Classroom

  1. Have students screencast to demonstrate reading mastery of Hebrew texts or liturgy.
  2. Planning for a substitute teacher? Record a screencast to leave directions for your students.
  3. Be sure to plan your screencast just like you would a play or any other video. Write a script or create a storyboard to ensure proper flow.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

February 21, 2017 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Here’s a list of over 150 websites of interest to lifelong learners. Definitely something for everyone!

Khan Academy has introduced an exploration of the storytelling process. They partnered with an exceptional source, too – Pixar Studios. Check out the course here.

We don’t know exactly what jobs of the future our students will hold, but we do know that educating kids to be problem-seeking design-thinking adults will serve them well. Ewan Mcintosh has a thoughtful blog post here where he addresses that. He has a good TED Talk about it, too.

 

February 17, 2017 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , , , | Leave a comment

Hyperdocs

The Technology: Hyperdocs

If you’ve made a commitment to use more technology in your classroom this year, Hyperdocs is a good way to begin. While encouraging and supporting technology use, it still puts educational goals front and center.

What is a Hyperdoc?

A Hyperdoc is a Google Doc that allows teachers to use the structure provided by a Google Doc to create lessons with engaging media, visual appeal, inquiry learning and opportunities for collaboration. Basically, it’s like an old-time worksheet, but with superior, 21st century tools.  With one simple link, students can access a Hyperdoc that contains instructions, links, tasks, multi-media and many more innovative features that can help get kids engaged and thinking.

How can I learn more about Hyperdocs?

The Hyperdocs website has great information and resources, including sample Hyperdocs, templates, a how-to tutorial, and links to Pinterest board collections of Hyperdocs. You can also check out the Hyperdocs YouTube playlist for some great explanatory videos.

How do I make my own Hyperdoc?

The easiest way to make your first Hyperdoc is to use one of the sample lesson plans on their website, and customize it for your own content. This basic lesson-plan template, for instance, details each part of a lesson (exploration, application, and sharing, for example), and gives suggestions for each step.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

February 14, 2017 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, G Suite (GAFE), Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Need a coloring book? Here are some awesome links to online resources you can download for free.

I’m a fan of the Talmud – how about you? This is HUGE news: Sefaria has announced the release of The William Davidson Talmud, a free digital edition of the Babylonian Talmud with parallel translations, interlinked to major commentaries, biblical citations, Midrash, Kabbalah, Halakhah, and an ever-growing library of Jewish texts. There’s a Sefaria app, too, which you can download here.

The Global Digital Citizen Foundation has another really nice guide on Nurturing Student Creativity Fluency. You can download the guide and watch the accompanying video here.

You can now insert videos from your Google Drive into Google Slides (you used to only be able to insert from YouTube). This is a great improvement! Here’s more info.

February 10, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , | Leave a comment

Quizizz

The Technology:

Quizizz is a website that you can use to create your own multiple choice, online quizzes. Its easy-to-use interface and growing database of pre-made quizzes makes it a favorite for teachers.

To use Quziziz to create your own quiz, click on “create” and begin entering your questions and multiple choice answers. Be sure to note whether each answer is correct or incorrect. Your questions can be in English or Hebrew. (Yes, Hebrew is supported!) If you’d prefer not to type in each question on the site itself, you can choose to import a .csv file instead.

Quiziz also allows you to choose a cover image for the quiz, determine if you want your quiz to be private or public, and select the duration for how long players have to answer each question.

Once you’ve created a quiz, you can play it live in your classroom, or share the link with students so they can  play it at home. Students play at their own pace and can review their answers as they proceed.

It’s free to sign up to use Quizizz. Once you’ve created your account, you can also search among the quiz database and find other user’s public quizzes to play.

In Your Classroom

  • There is no question that kids love online quiz sites! Quiziz is a great addition to the quiz format because unlike many other quiz-making tools, Quiziz allows students to determine their own pace. This makes Quizizz particularly suitable for reviewing material at home.
  • Don’t forget about the quiz database.  A search for “Israel” returned hundreds of results. Note that you don’t have to use an existing quiz in its entirety; you can modify it and just include the questions that meet your needs.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

February 7, 2017 Posted by | Technology Tuesdays | , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Here’s a nice slide show from Shelley Terrell on some new ideas you should try this year.

I’m a big fan of critical thinking – how about you? EdTech blogger Lee Crockett has a nice downloadable workbook of critical thinking games and activities, as well as a very cool poster. Get it here.

Want to use recording radio stories as a teaching tool? Check out the lesson plans from Radio Rookies.

February 3, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Klikaklu

The Technology: Klikaklu

Give your scavenger hunts a high-tech edge! Use the Klikaklu app to create and play photo-hunt games that utilize your iphone’s camera and GPS.

It’s a great way to get your students to interact with an environment, and have them explore ideas without being stuck at their desks. Your hunt can include clues that are photos, descriptions of objects, or even QR codes. Clues can be designed to unexpectedly appear when the hunter arrives at a specific location, and you can also include quizzes or polls as a part of your custom scavenger hunt as well. 

There’s a great tutorial within the app that shows you how to create your first hunt, and there’s also a good discussion forum on the Klikaklu website with ideas and troubleshooting steps.

Download the app from the Apple App Store, and sign up for a free account to be able to create hunts.   The free version will allow you to participate in unlimited hunts, and create up to three of your own hunts. To create more, you’ll need to upgrade at a cost of $9.99. In most cases, a school should be able to upgrade on just one device and have other users download the free app.

Note: Klikaklu is only available for iOS at this time.

In Your Classroom

  • This is a fabulous way to add engagement to a field trip.
  • What an amazing way to introduce new campers to camp or to provide a self-guided experience for potential campers.
  • Don’t forget adults! A digital scavenger hunt can be a terrific activity for a teacher conference or retreat.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

January 22, 2017 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

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