MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

visme

The Technology: Visme

Everybody knows that old quote about how many words a picture is worth. It’s true! And with the website Visme, you can create your own infographics and other visually based content easily. 

You can build your infographic using the images that Visme provides, including layouts, shapes, text, graphs and backgrounds. Or, you can choose to upload your own images. It also allows you to insert video or music into your infographics.

When you’re finished designing your image, you can download a watermarked low-resolution .jpg and embed your infographic on a website or share it on social media for free. (Higher resolution images without Visme’s branding are available with a premium account).

Sign up for a free account at Visme.

In Your Classroom

  • An infographic is a terrific alternative assessment to allow students to “show what they know.” For example, ask them to create an infographic that displays the meaning of the four questions.
  • Do give students sufficient time to carefully plan an infographic that actually presents meaningful data.
  • Infographics are terrific for illustrating the flow of any tefillah service, or the seder.
  • Timelines are a natural activity for history classrooms. Ask them to start from Joseph, and end with Moses parting the sea.

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

March 28, 2017 Posted by | Behrman House Technology Tuesday, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Here are some more creative ways teachers are using to teach about fake news.

Love this making mensches periodic table graphic! It would be great as a poster (hint, hint)…

I taught sketchnoting (visual note-taking) to a number of 7th and 8th graders this week. It was so interesting to hear their thoughts about handwriting. I found this terrific blog post about the value of taking notes in longhand and effective note-taking.

February 24, 2017 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

Sketchnoting

The Technology: Sketchnoting/ Paper

Taking notes by hand can often be more effective than typing them into a laptop or tablet. Similarly, sketchnoting, the act of drawing a visual story while listening to a speaker or reading a text, can also be an excellent way for students to remember and synthesize new information. 

There are many apps that support sketching on a tablet, but my favorite is Paper.

It gives you basic, digital drawing tools like markers, pencils, and an eraser, and allows you to arrange your drawings into notebooks and easily organize your work. You can also integrate photos into your drawings. 

After you have completed your sketchnotes, you can save them to the iPad’s camera roll, share them via email, or post them to social media. 

Paper is free to download, but you will also need a stylus for your tablet. They can be purchased for as little as $6.00 on amazon.

In Your Classroom

  • Kathy Schrock’s guide to sketchnoting features articles about the active listening process, how to integrate it into your classroom, and how to teach it to your students.
  • You may have to spend some time teaching your students how to be active listeners and how to arrange what they’re hearing to best suit their way of learning. This blog post about sketchnoting in third grade gives some great examples.
  • Have your students sketchnote various parts of a history or Bible lesson and then share them with one another. Consider printing them out for the classroom as well. 
  • Do you have students who just want to doodle throughout the entire class? Be on the lookout for students with whom this visual activity will resonate!

This is a “Technology Tuesday” post via Behrman House, edited by Ann D. Koffsky . You can find more Behrman House Technology Tuesdays here.

January 3, 2017 Posted by | Sketchnoting, Technology Tuesdays, Uncategorized | , , | Leave a comment

   

%d bloggers like this: