MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

Do you want to build a (virtual) sukkah?

Screen Shot 2019-05-15 at 12.26.19 PMYes, I know it’s May.

I’m already starting to think about we’re going to use VR/AR next year and authentically connect it to general or Judaic studies. Our fourth grade does a wonderful project where they design a sukkah, reduce its proportions in math and then create a 3D design using Tinkercad which we print. So what comes next?

I’d like to have my fifth graders use CoSpaces to create a virtual sukkah to which they can add elements like the brachot, lulav and etrog models, and then do some creative coding. Could they have lights? Could they wave the lulav? Make a blessing?

CoSpaces is my choice because it’s easy to get the basics down but really limitless in terms of coding. It’s reasonably priced and you can set up classes and assign spaces to groups of kids so they’re working collaboratively but simultaneously. That wasn’t exactly intuitive to figure out and I plan to have another post about exactly how to do that.

CoSpaces has building materials but there was nothing that was lattice-like for a sukkah. I was able to create one in Tinkercad, though, and import it. You can also use Blender or SketchUp, but I was going for quick and easy at this time.

Here’s the space so far if you want to play. More to come.

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May 15, 2019 Posted by | Augmented Reality, virtual reality | , , , , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

“It all starts with a question…” Here’s a nice article about inquiry-based learning and how to encourage students to take charge of their learning.

People tend to confuse problem-based learning and project-based learning. Check out this article for an in-depth examination.

Remember the great scene in “Star Trek IV” where Scotty tries talking to the computer? And then he says “How quaint” when he’s told to use the keyboard. Maybe you even talk to your phone to get it to do things for you (Siri…). If voice recognition interests you, you may want to pop over to Google’s newest web program, Speak To Go. Designed to work with a VR headset (think Google cardboard), the site does work within your Chrome browser if you enable your microphone. It’s not perfect (yet), but it’s just the tip of the VR iceberg.

April 20, 2017 Posted by | Links You'll Love | , , , | Leave a comment

   

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