MuseForJews

muse: n. a source of inspiration

Links You’ll Love

Power Google Tip: Need to look something up or search for an image while working in Google docs on a computer (not iOS)? This is terrific – go to Tools > Research to open a Research pane. There you can search the dictionary, for an image, among quotes and more. You can even specify that you want to find images that are copyright free. Slick!

Movenote is a slick website where you can easily create movies. You can upload existing content like PDF files or jpgs, or you can record using the computer’s camera. You can link it with your Google account to access your Google drive docs, too. Movies can be shared, downloaded or embedded. There’s a free iOS app, too!

I still have nightmares about the time I was in charge of timing students during a Lag BaOmer relay race. I just couldn’t keep those kids straight! Clearly, I needed the Meeting Monopolizer app, which Daniel shared with me this week. You can read more about this 99 cent wonder here. It was originally designed to track which meeting-goer monopolizes your meetings, but apparently people have found more and more uses for it, including timing relays and tracking class participation.

January 23, 2015 Posted by | GAFE, Google | , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Everyone knows that formative assessment can be the key to delivering a lesson that every student “gets.” Vicki Davis addresses different ways to integrate formative assessment using technology in this Edutopia article.

Coggle is a quick way to create a mind map that you can save into your Google drive and share with others. Just sign in using your Google account, click and go!

I love me some copyright-free stuff! The Public Domain Review is a collection of images, books, films, audio and more that have fallen out of copyright and into the public domain, which makes them available for anyone (students, I’m looking at you) to remix, mash and use wherever and however they want.

Twisted Wave is a browser-based audio editor. A free account gives you one hour of storage for mono files. You can record using your computer mic or edit an existing audio file. Files can be downloaded or sent to Google drive. This is a Flash-based site, so it does not work on iOS devices.

Shoutout to Daniel for finding RefMe. Similar to EasyBib, RefMe is an online citation site. Its super-clean interface makes it very nice to use!

January 16, 2015 Posted by | Links You'll Love | | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Infographics are all the rage now, for good reason. And knowing how to translate written information into graphics is a great skill. Piktochart is a nice website for creating your own infographics, reports and presentations. Like many other sites, it offers both free and premium (meaning, they cost money) templates, but the free templates look really good.

Well, this is nice . . . MindMup gives you a free cloud-based space to create collaborative mind maps shared through Google! Very nice.

Have you fallen in love with Google Classroom and created fabulous original lessons using the platform? If your answer is yes, you could open your own Google Classroom store. Who knows? You could sell some stuff!

Flipquiz is another fun site to create a jeopardy-type game. Create a category, add your questions, and go. This would be terrific for students to use!

Plenty of you are discovering that Google is a great place to create graphic organizers, especially if you want to share them with your students. The AppsUserGroup has a bunch of awesome templates you can download for free.

OOOOOOH – this is beautiful. If you want to create a really slick timeline (or have your students create them . . . ), check out Timeline JS. You begin with a Google spreadsheet listing the event, dates, text and links to any online media like movies or photos, and Timeline JS will create a timeline for you.

This is the coolest thing . . . what would happen if you poured molten aluminum in an abandoned ant colony? I know that you’ve wondered that often. Well, now you don’t have to wonder any more, thanks to AntHill Art. The videos are very cool, and would be terrific to share with students who are interested in what an ant colony actually looks like. All those little tunnels!

December 19, 2014 Posted by | Google, Links You'll Love | , | 1 Comment

Augmented Reality

A is for . . . Augmented Reality. What’s augmented reality and why use in education? Augmented reality is just adding a digital layer of information over the physical world. Using a device of some kind, like an iPad, a user views something that exists in the physical world (like a piece of paper, a building, or a magazine ad), but sees more. Imagine being able to view a building and see what it looked like 100 years ago? Or scanning a photo of a person and then seeing a movie where he or she is speaking? There are some terrific apps that take advantage of augmented reality – here are just a few:

  • ColARMix. Download and color the coloring pages from the ColAR website and then view them using the ColAR Mix app on an iPad. You can even pick up the items!
  • Aurasma: Aurasma is considered by many people to be the granddaddy of augmented reality apps. It’s actually pretty easy to use – just create your content (what you want people to see via the device), take a photo of the trigger (what you want people to scan), and layer the two. Then, when people view the trigger via the app, they’ll see the content you created!
  • AR Flashcards: With AR Flashcards, you point your device at the printed flashcard, and a 3D image will appear. You can even tap on the image to hear its name and get more information.
  • ARISGames. ARIS, in development at the University of Wisconsin, gives developers the ability to create digital scavenger hunts that can be played remotely or on location. See this post to find out more about Purim about three years ago when I developed a scavenger hunt that allowed students to converse with Esther and Mordecai. If you want more information about ARIS, please see me (or take my workshop at the upcoming ICE Conference).

How could you use augmented reality in class? What about recording raps to teach vocabulary words that appear when the word is scanned on a word wall? Or book trailers that play when you scan the cover of a book? How about recording yourself giving instructions to complete an exercise when an assignment is scanned?

December 9, 2014 Posted by | Augmented Reality | , , | Leave a comment

Behrman House Technology Tuesdays – Plickers

I’m so excited that I’ll be sharing links and information about great mobile apps with Behrman House Technology Tuesdays subscribers! Click here to subscribe to this free email.

Here’s the article about Plickers that came out this past Tuesday:

(cross posted from Behrman House Technology Tuesdays)

The Technology: Plickers iOS App and Website

is a terrific iOS app that provides instant formative assessment (meaning you can get feedback mid-lesson) without using student response devices. All you need is a set of Plickers cards for your students, and one iOS device (iPad, iPod or iPhone) for the teacher. The app and registration is free.

The name comes from paper + clickers… Get it? Plickers.

Setting up your class:

  1. After you’ve signed up for an account and logged in, download the cards you want to use from the website. The standard size prints two cards per letter-sized sheet (that size worked well for the fifth graders with whom I tested this). For younger students, you might want to print the cards out full size. Do consider printing the cards on card stock, but only laminate if you have matte laminate. Otherwise the glare will impact the scanning function.
  2. Set up your classes on the website. You’ll have to add students manually and assign them to cards (each card is numbered).
  3. Create questions. You can create questions, save them, and then add them to classes at a later date. Questions can’t be open-ended – they need to be multiple choice or true/false. (And, yes, you can type in Hebrew on the website.)

With your students:

  1. Introduce them to Plickers by handing out and examining the cards with them. See the letters A – D, one on each side? That’s how you answer a Plickers question: be sure that the letter you want to choose is at the top of the card when you hold it up.
  2. Open the Plickers app on your device and tap on a question.
  3. Ask your question and instruct the students to hold their cards up to answer.
  4. Here’s where Plickers does its magic: stand in the front of your room and use the scanner (it’s the camera icon) in the app to scan the cards. The scanner will read the cards and provide data in real time. It tells you which student is giving you which answer – instantly!

To use Plickers, sign up for a free account. Then download the app.

In Your Classroom:

  • While I love technology, I also love when there’s a low-tech solution! This is a terrific way to get instant feedback without having to deal with student devices and the inevitable glitches that accompany them. We’re talking about cards, here – there’s nothing lower-tech than that.
  • This is a lovely way to find out who doesn’t “get” something without having to put your students through the potential embarrassment of admitting it. Nobody can see what card someone is holding up.
  • Not only do you get real-time data, but you can also go back to the Plickers website later to get archived data to review later. There is some very powerful information there.

December 5, 2014 Posted by | Technology Tuesdays | , | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Here’s a lovely article about gratitude and how expressing it can benefit your students. Better grades, even!

Doing research is easy, right? Um . . . not so much. This interactive diagram is a great way to have your students approach research. There are links to planning your project, where to search other than online, how to take notes and use information, and creative ways to share what you’ve learned.

If you want a free and easy way to create online flashcards, or an online Jeopardy game, you might want to give Flippity a try. You should also read this post at on how to create your own Jeopardy-style game.

Here’s an interesting read on how we should be changing our teaching practice to teach the “Google generation.”

December 4, 2014 Posted by | Links You'll Love | | Leave a comment

Behrman House’s Technology Tips

Excited that I’m sharing my tips with Behrman House!

December 2, 2014 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

ICE is coming! Yeah – you’re probably thinking, “Well, duh, I’ve been outside . . . I know.” No… ICE as in the Illinois Computing Educators. The annual ICE conference will be held in February in lovely St. Charles, Illinois (so it doesn’t involve a whole lot of travel, and no overnight stay). The ICE workshops take place just before the general conference and provide in-depth training in a variety of techie topics. ICE workshops are also a great way to use your professional development dollars. Check out the workshops here.

Kahoot.it is another one of those online multiple choice quiz sites where you can put questions in and your students play entering the game pin that you specify, and answering questions. I think it’s very engaging – you can type in Hebrew, there’s fun music, and it ranks players as you play the game. You can also put photos in to increase engagement, and a video option is in beta right now (that’s cool – play a video and stop in pre-determined locations to ask questions).

Where do good ideas come from? That’s a fascinating question, and one I think about often. Here’s an interesting video on the subject:

Google tip of the week: are you going batty with folders in your Google Drive? Here’s a neat tip that can help. Change the color of your folders by clicking on a folder and right-clicking on it (to right-click with a one-button mouse, hold down the control key and click). Lookie there – you can give a folder a star (which puts it in Starred in your drive), and/or you can change the folder’s color! Makes it easier to locate. Sadly, folder colors don’t show up (yet) on mobile devices.

November 21, 2014 Posted by | Links You'll Love, Mobile devices and apps | , , , | Leave a comment

Links you’ll love – 11-14-14

I think I’ve written about Chirbit before, but it may be worth another visit. Chirbit is a nifty little website for working with audio. You can record or upload a message and then make it available to others (who can then comment on your Chirbit) via weblink or QR code. It will also “speak” text that you type into the website. What I found most useful, though, is that Chirbit will extract the audio from a YouTube video. Any Chirbit can be downloaded as an .mp3 file.

iPad app tip: Let’s say you’re doing an activity with your class and you want to get instant feedback to assess for understanding. Or maybe you’re doing a poll or survey. Let’s say you also don’t have iPads or laptops for your students, but you still want to have a feedback mechanism that assures privacy (no student wants to be the one to raise his or her hand and say “I don’t understand”) and gives you student-by-student results. What can you do? One option is to download the free Plickers app to your phone or iPad. Then print out the plickers cards for your students (get it? Paper + clickers = plickers). Create your assessment (it’s a lot like using Socrative or Nearpod), hand out the cards and scan with the app. It’s very cool, extremely low tech, and we got rave reviews from the fifth graders with whom we tested it last week. Visit Plickers for more info.

Love New York? Love Jewish books? This map is awesome. It’s the Jewish Book Council’s literary map of New York City and it marks the landmarks, descriptions, and allusions found in the works of some of our heritage’s greatest writers. Fun!

Google Tip: OMG! This is terrific. Did you ever think it would be useful if you could create an email contact group on the fly while sending an email? C’mon . . . you know you want to do this! Here’s how:

Create the email, placing the recipients in the “To” section
Once all your recipients are listed, click on the word “To.” Click right on that puppy
This should bring up a dialogue box where you could include other recipients. If you look at the bottom of that box, though, you’ll see the magic box that says “Save as group . . .”
That will save your group to your contacts for future use. It may take a few minutes for it to appear – but this is a handy tip!

November 14, 2014 Posted by | Links You'll Love | | Leave a comment

Links You’ll Love

Most of us are old enough (cough, cough) to remember when there were no food allergies. When we could throw a loaf of bread and a jar of peanut butter into a bag so kids didn’t go hungry on field trips . . . Well, Stanford University is making some fascinating inroads into bringing those days back. Read more about Stanford’s medical trial in oral immunotherapy here.

The folks at TED-Ed have created a video and lesson for every element on the periodic table. You can view them by starting here. Not only are there videos, but there are also accompanying lesson plans with questions to deepen understanding, suggestions for further research, and, in some cases, guided discussion questions. This is obviously a great resource for teaching the periodic table, but also a good model for how to use video as a starting point for lessons.

I’m super excited about this article on digital learning. The author, Dr. Tim Clark, focuses on the various elements of a classroom (essential questions, assessment, classroom environment, etc.) and how technology can support them. I like this so much that I’m thinking about structuring a series of classes around this concept – let me know if you’d be interested.

Oh my! Wait’ll you see THIS! Here’s a beyond awesome Google tip: Did you notice that there’s a “Web clipboard” command under the Edit menu in many Google apps like Slides, Docs and Drawing? Do you have ANY idea what that means? Check it out: select the thing you want to copy to the web clipboard, and go to Edit > Web clipboard. Select “copy selection to web clipboard.” Unlike the invisible Mac clipboard that can only hold one item at a time, Google will save all the things you copy. Then you can paste whatever you’ve copied at a later date. But wait! There’s more. That elegant little web clipboard is available on any computer, any time you log in using your Google account. How sweet is that? I also tested this with Google Docs on the iPad . . . it worked as long as I used Chrome to edit the Google Doc (as opposed to using the Docs app). If you need a tutorial on this, here’s a good video:

November 7, 2014 Posted by | Google, Links | , | Leave a comment

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 811 other followers

%d bloggers like this: